spacer
home > ebr > spring 2019 > pricing clinical research in the canadian industry
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Pricing Clinical Research in the Canadian Industry

The Canadian federal and provincial governments have shown a considerable interest in pharmaceutical R&D, including basic and applied research. Federal agencies have measured both types of research using a cost-of-production approach, including expenditures on materials, supplies, and labour and depreciation on capital. They have used these basic measures to gauge the resources that were used by industry to achieve progress in innovation. Other benefits can be derived from R&D, especially from clinical (patient-included) research and clinical trials. In industry-funded clinical research, companies pay for both the medicines and clinical services provided to the trial enrolees, replacing both public and private payments. The cost concepts that are used to measure the market impact of pharma R&D are very different to those used in government policy documents.

The importance of the market concept of ‘replacement cost’ is that it provides an indicator of the degree to which industry ‘subsidises’ healthcare through its clinical research, including publicly funded care. This concept has largely been lost when considering the role of industry in the healthcare system.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

 You must be a member of the site to make a comment.
spacer
Dr Dat T Tran is a pharmacist by training and has a PhD in health services and policy research, as well as a master of science in pharmacy from the Hanoi University of Pharmacy, Vietnam, master of public health from the University of Sydney, Australia, and a PhD at the University of Alberta, Canada. His research interests lie at the confluence of health and economic perspectives of decision-making against a backdrop of limited healthcare resources.

Dr Ilke Akpinar has a Doctor of Medicine from the University of Ankara, Turkey, and has completed a paediatric surgery residency at the University of Akdeniz, Turkey. She has a master of science in health policy research, specialising in health economics from the School of Public Health, University of Alberta. She has over five years of applied research experience in Canada, with more than 10 years of clinical experience as a paediatric surgeon in Turkey. Ilke’s research interests include health outcomes and health services research, with a particular interest in the cost of clinical trials for medical devices and pharmaceuticals, economic evaluations for chronic diseases, and screening programmes.

Dr Philip Jacobs is a Professor of health economics in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Alberta, Canada. He received his PhD in economics from the University of York, UK, and was a Cost Accountant. Philip’s research is in the area of healthcare finance and economic evaluations of drugs, vaccines, and medical devices. He was the codeveloper of the healthcare costing document for the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health and has conducted economic evaluations of clinical trials for vaccines, cancer drugs, intensive care, and neonatal intensive care.
spacer
Dr Dat T Tran
spacer
spacer
spacer
Dr Ilke Akpinar
spacer
spacer
spacer
Dr Philip Jacobs
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Smart Bioprocessing with the new Eppendorf Control System

Hamburg, February 12, 2020 Working with flexible systems that evolve with the changing needs in a lab is indispensable. With the SciVario twin, Eppendorf, a key life science company, introduces its latest bioreactor control system for small- and bench-scale applications. The intelligent controller and new, innovative bay-drawer system enables the exchange of standardized modules to flexibly adapt the controller to the changing requirements in a laboratory.
More info >>

White Papers

Cleaning Validation: What do you need to consider to ensure a successful outcome?

RSSL

Cross contamination must be avoided in the Pharmaceutical industry at all costs and successful cleaning validation ensures that patients are not put at risk due to cross contamination. The process can be divided into a number of sections each of which must be fully understood and areas of concern addressed to ensure a successful outcome across the entire process. This spans both the manufacturing and subsequent analytical and microbological support. The data used to confirm a positive/successful cleaning validation is underpinned by the results of validated analytical methods. It is essential that these results are truly representative as patient safety is based upon the absence of equipment residues. So what are those areas of concern, what affects your ability to get a successful outcome and what do you need to consider when carrying out a Cleaning Validation exercise?
More info >>

 
Industry Events

World Vaccine Congress Europe

18-21 October 2020, Barcelona, Spain

The World Vaccine Congress is an award-winning series of conferences and exhibitions that have grown to become the largest and most established vaccine meeting of its kind across the globe. Our credibility is show through the prestigious scientific advisory board that spend months of hard work creating a new and topical agenda, year on year.
More info >>

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement