samedan logo

 
 
spacer
home > ebr > autumn 2001 > putting function first in proteomics
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Putting Function First in Proteomics

The last few years have seen an enormous revival in protein science under the relatively new name of 'proteomics'. The term proteome was coined by Marc Wilkins in 1994, and is used to describe the entire protein complement of the genome. This can be further defined as the protein complement at any point in time - underlining the fact that proteins are complex, dynamic systems constantly changing in number and structure in response to physiological and environmental stimuli. Unlike traditional protein biochemistry, the science of proteomics generally refers to large-scale protein studies involving the high throughput screening and identification of novel proteins. A key aim of proteomics is to uncover the function of novel proteins - so providing possible new targets for drug intervention. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology not only provides a means of isolating novel proteins, but also of uncovering their functional properties.


Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
By Stefan Löfås, Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at Biacore AB

Stefan Löfås holds a PhD and BSc in Organic Chemistry. He has extensive technical and scientific experience in the development and commercialisation of bioanalytical instrumentation at Biacore AB, having worked for the company since 1985. He has been deeply involved in the development of Biacore's sensor chip chemistry and applications. Recently appointed Chief Scientific Officer, he has responsibility for technical development projects, external scientific collaborations and technical aspects on the IPR portfolio. Prior to this role, Dr Löfås was Director of Biacore's Biochemistry and Chemistry department within R&D.
spacer
Stefan Löfås
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Synthego Launches Engineered Cell Libraries to Validate Targets with Speed and Accelerate Drug Discovery

Aug 02, REDWOOD CITY, Calif. – Synthego, the genome engineering company, today announced the launch of Engineered Cell Libraries, a novel offering that further enables access to CRISPR by providing arrayed CRISPR-edited cells for direct use in functional screening assays. The innovative solution leverages Synthego’s Eclipse™ Platform. This high-throughput cell engineering platform delivers cell-based models for disease research by providing highly predictable CRISPR-engineered cells at scale through the integration of engineering, bioinformatics, and proprietary science. Synthego’s Engineered Cell Libraries provide unparalleled speed, scalability, and efficiency to accelerate the drug discovery process by enabling a faster path between experimental design and execution.
More info >>

White Papers

Smaller, Smarter, Electronic, Connected: The Next Generation of Drug-Delivery Devices

Phillips-Medisize

An exciting trend in drug delivery is underway: the movement toward smaller, smarter, wirelessly connected electronic devices that allow patient-administered therapy. Inspired by the technological advancements driving the consumer electronics market, new methods for drug delivery show great promise for all stakeholders. Patients wishing to claim more autonomy over their drug regimens, caregivers and medical professionals wanting to more closely monitor drug compliance, health insurance organizations looking to keep costs down, and developers of pharmaceutical products interested in conducting better managed clinical trials can all benefit from these novel, next-generation technologies.
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement