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European Pharmaceutical Contractor

The Hungarian Way

Procurement experts of manufacturers and CROs have their tasks cut out to ensure that their multi-country trials are adequately provided with a wide range of properly packaged and distributed supplies, including comparators, rescue medicine or products for basic and complementary therapy. Not only is there a wide portfolio of required products and services, but they should also be procured:
  • Based on strict timelines
  • With the maximum level of cost-efficiency
  • From suppliers who meet the highest standards of industry-specific quality control requirements
  • With the widest array of supporting documentation (Certificate of Analysis [COA], Certificate of Conformance [COC] and so forth).

To solve this often contradictory puzzle and successfully meet all the above criteria, supply chain specialists have started to increasingly give preference to local – as opposed to central – sourcing strategies. In these cases, the procurement of clinical trial supplies and related services (like storage, packaging, labelling or distribution for example) are not controlled from a central depot, but organised locally by qualified vendors in each country where the investigator sites are located. This approach could offer multiple advantages, including savings as a result of lower purchasing prices for product supplies; access to products in national languages; decreased logistic costs; and increased speed of supply.

Rise of Hungary

In recent years, countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have begun to play a more important role within the domain of global clinical trials. Several countries in the region have seen a growing number of their healthcare institutions become qualified investigator sites. Hungary in particular has benefited tremendously from this process; not only have the number of clinical trials grown gradually, but procurement experts have also started to consider the country as a destination for local sourcing strategies ever more frequently. Many sponsors and CROs are now sourcing the full range of clinical trial supplies required for investigator sites in Hungary via local partners, who are also in charge of the storage, labelling and domestic delivery of these products. There are several reasons for this, which are detailed as follows.

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Tibor Kovacs coordinates the work of the Clinical Trial division at PharmaRoad, overseeing business relations with sponsors, clinical research organisations and clinical trial supply specialists. His work entails commercial, logistic and quality controlrelated aspects of clinical trial supplies, and he regularly acts as the lead representative during the vendor qualification and auditing processes conducted by the company’s international partners. Tibor holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Lincoln, UK, a graduate degree from the Asia-Europe Institute, Malaysia, and a postgraduate degree from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
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Tibor Kovacs
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