spacer
home > ebr > autumn 2009 > stem cell elimination
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Stem Cell Elimination

 

DEFINITION

There are at least two theories that try to explain tumour formation and growth. The first is the stochastic model, which assumes that all cancer cells have a low but equal tumour forming capacity; the second is the cancer stem cell or tumour initiating model. This theory suggests that there is a small population of cells within a tumour responsible for its generation and maintenance, and that these cells are also capable of forming new tumours. All other cells in the tumour lack this capacity. Hence there is a cellular hierarchy within a tumour, with all cells ultimately derived from this small population of cancer stem cells. In recent years, more and more publications have provided evidence in support of the cancer stem cell/tumour initiating cell hypothesis, and this report will summarise some of the literature and techniques used in the analysis of cancer stem cells. From here on, this model will be referred to as the cancer stem cell model, but this is interchangeable with the tumour initiating cell model.

The term ‘cancer stem cell’ and its definition – “a cancer stem cell is a cell within a tumour that possesses the capacity to selfrenew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumour” – were determined by a group of non-stem cell and stem cell scientists at a scientific meeting in 2006 (1). This term describes the function of these cells well, but unintentionally causes some confusion, as it suggests that a cancer stem cell is derived from a stem cell (2). Rather, a cancer stem cell is any cell which has acquired the characteristics of a stem cell within a tumour and meets the criteria in the definition above. WHY STUDY CANCER STEM CELLS? It is acknowledged that while existing cancer therapies reduce the bulk of the rapidly proliferating and differentiating cells within a tumour, they may not have an effect on the cancer stem cells, which are possibly more dormant or resistant to treatment. The ability to reduce tumour mass, while allowing these cells to survive, may explain why many tumours recur following treatment (see Figure 1). Identifying agents that can remove the cancer stem cells from a tumour may provide an effective strategy in the treatment of cancer, and such agents may be curative rather than palliative.


Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer

Kirsty Holden is a Senior Scientist in the Contract Research division of Epistem Ltd, and has worked there for two years. She has a BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry from UMIST, Manchester and a PhD in Mammary Cell Biology and Apoptosis from the University of Manchester. She worked at SmithKline Beecham between her BSc and PhD degrees and held a post-doctoral research position in mammary gland biology, extracellular protease activity and wound healing at the Finsen Laboratory, Copenhagen, prior to joining Epistem.

Kevin Jones is a Senior Scientist in the Contract Research division of Epistem Ltd. He has a BSc (Hons) in Pharmacology from the University of Liverpool and a PhD in Intracellular Accumulation of the HIV Protease Inhibitors and the Effect of Active Transport, also from the University of Liverpool. Kevin worked in the DMPK department at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals for seven years following his PhD. His role involved developing new assays and focusing on the effects of active transporters on the absorption and distribution of NCEs.

spacer
Kirsty A Holden
spacer
spacer
spacer
Kevin Jones
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Merck to Provide BioReliance® End-to-End Solutions to Phanes Therapeutics

• Collaboration to accelerate development and manufacturing of Bispecific Antibody • Merck plans to offer Phanes a full suite of products and services under its BioReliance® offering
More info >>

White Papers

Mauritius Island – An Emerging Centre for R&D in Biotechnology and the Life Sciences

CIDP (Centre International de Développement Pharmaceutique)

Mauritius, the tropical island situated in the Indian Ocean and known worldwide for its beautiful beaches, is also internationally recognised for its rule of law, and political and social stability. Over the past few years, the economy has been successfully transitioned from a monocrop to a diversified innovation-driven and knowledge-based economy, resting on agribusiness, export-oriented manufacturing, tourism, financial services, property development and real estate, ICT-BPO, the seafood industry, a free port, logistics and a nascent ocean economy. Emerging sectors such as healthcare and life sciences are presenting some niche areas for the taking, and the enabling environment is being put in place to make it happen - especially in the light of sustained growth within pharmaceutical, medical device, and clinical research. Important international players are already in operation locally as the country has established the appropriate legal and regulatory frameworks based on international norms, for the development of a strong biomedical research sector.
More info >>

 
Industry Events

World Vaccine Congress Europe

18-21 October 2020, Barcelona, Spain

The World Vaccine Congress is an award-winning series of conferences and exhibitions that have grown to become the largest and most established vaccine meeting of its kind across the globe. Our credibility is show through the prestigious scientific advisory board that spend months of hard work creating a new and topical agenda, year on year.
More info >>

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement