samedan logo
 
 
 
spacer
home > ebr > autumn 2019 > focusing on target safety
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Focusing on Target Safety




Despite the increase in drug approvals in recent years, drug discovery and development remain an uncertain and costly endeavour with depressingly high rates of failure. The era of Big Data and artificial intelligence (AI) offers the potential to manipulate huge amounts of data and discern patterns, offering scientists better insights and supporting better decisions than previously. Consequently, stakeholders across all disciplines are exploring ways to incorporate these powerful new approaches into their thinking. The identification of better drug targets, safer and more effective molecules, and improved patient selection should lead to better drugs as well as greater efficiency and decreased costs.

AI describes when a machine mimics cognitive functions such as learning and problem solving. There is much excitement in published literature and in the press around the many current and potential uses of AI in drug discovery and development. Recently, the ability of an AI platform to beat experts at poker caused more excitement in scientific literature and in the popular press. Overall, AI has great potential in enhancing success via learning and predicting patterns in biology, medicine, and chemistry. Regarding biology, AI could be used to explore unknown disease mechanisms, to analyse signalling pathways pointing to new potential drug targets, and has further utility in profiling those drug targets. Regarding chemistry, AI could be used to explore and define new chemical space, to suggest new drug structures, and for structure- and ligand-based virtual screening. Regarding medicine, AI has great use in analysing disease patterns in support of precision medicine, perhaps linked to individual genetics. There is additional interest in computational techniques to suggest new purposes for existing medicines based on a reverse relationship between the genetic profiles of the disease and cellular responses to drugs. AI is expected to make the hunt for new pharmaceuticals quicker, cheaper, and more effective.

Traditionally, drug discovery and development follow two broad paradigms; they could be driven by research aimed at meeting an unmet medical need in a population or driven by basic (often academic) research that identifies new targets, pathways, and mechanisms that may have therapeutic use. Irrespective of the drivers, drug discovery has traditionally relied upon human intelligence to interpret data and predict outcomes. With its potential to digitise all aspects of this process, AI now brings almost limitless computational power to the detection of patterns, connections, and potential outcomes.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
Professor Ruth Roberts is a Director and Co-Founder of ApconiX Ltd, a global team of nonclinical drug safety specialists. Ruth is Chair and Director of Drug Discovery at the University of Birmingham, UK, and was previously Global Head of Regulatory Safety at AstraZeneca. With 140 publications in peer reviewed journals, she is former President of the British Toxicology Society, former Secretary to the Society of Toxicology (SOT), President of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences, and a recently elected board member of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. Ruth was also the recipient of the SOT Achievement award in 2002, the EUROTOX Bo Holmstedt Award in 2009, and the SOT Founders award in 2018 for outstanding leadership in toxicology.
spacer
Professor Ruth Roberts
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

ICON Releases Environmental, Social and Governance Report

ICON announced today the release of its 2020 Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Report.
More info >>

White Papers

Systems Engineering for Complex Portable Medical Device Development

Phillips-Medisize

As the demand for complex, portable medical devices continues to grow, reducing risk and increasing efficiency during the development of these products should be paramount. Taking a systems-engineering (SE) approach to development provides a holistic, organized, and deliberate method for identifying as well as reducing both patient and business risks early in the process. Furthermore, it facilitates efficient progression throughout the entire product development life cycle.
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement