samedan logo
 
 
 
spacer
home > ebr > autumn 2021 > probing models of neurological disease in a dish using multielectrode arrays
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Probing Models of Neurological Disease in a Dish Using Multielectrode Arrays

The unique electrical properties of neurons make them challenging to study. Because of this, many cell biologists might feel that the brain is off limits – that only the most highly-trained electrophysiologists can unravel the mysteries of the nervous system. However, this is not the case. Thanks to advancements in bioelectroniconic assays, all cell biologists can now study neural networks without electrophysiology training.

Traditional electrophysiological techniques, such as patchclamp recording require significant skill and hands-on time. Given the amount of training needed to perform this technique, the practice is almost exclusively performed by specialised electrophysiologists. However, even with experience and training, patch-clamp still has its limits. Researchers can only record data from a handful of cells per day. Furthermore, the technique enables recordings from only one neuron at a time and, therefore, does not capture the rich network activity that is characteristic of the brain. Finally, because neurons are so fickle ex vivo, a scientist also needs a bit of luck to ensure their experiment works out.

In contrast, bioelectronic assays, such as multielectrode array (MEA) assays, enable any researcher to simultaneously monitor the activity of dozens of cultured neural networks over time without specialised training. These assays are composed of a microtitre plate with grids of microelectrodes embedded in each well. These arrays are often used to record neural population activity on the surface of the brain in living animals; however, when they are embedded in a microtitre plate, they can make extracellular recordings of neural activity in vitro. This setup enables any cell biologist to analyse the neural activity of their cultures, track how networks develop, and monitor the emergence and progression of disease phenotypes at the benchtop. The accessibility of this technology adds a new tool to a neurobiologist’s toolbox to catalyse biomarker and drug discovery for neurological diseases.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
James Ross PhD is the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Axion BioSystems, as well as the Co-Founder and Scientific Advisor of BioCircuit. James has over 20 years’ experience in bioelectronic technology development, devoting much of his efforts to commercialising cost-effective cellular interfaces and softwarereconfigurable analysis tools. He received his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Louisiana State University, US, in 2000, and his PhD in Neuroengineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, US, in 2008.
spacer
James Ross PhD
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

CARMAT Announces the First Human Implant of its Total Artificial Heart in the United States

Paris, July 15, 2021 - 7 am CEST CARMAT (FR0010907956, ALCAR), the designer and developer of the world's most advanced total artificial heart, aiming to fulfill an unmet medical need by providing a therapeutic alternative to people suffering from end-stage biventricular heart failure, announces the first implantation of its bioprosthetic artificial heart, Aeson®, in the United States within the framework of the Early Feasibility Study (EFS).
More info >>

White Papers
 
Industry Events

Pharma Integrates 2021

16 November 2021, VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

Now in its tenth year, Pharma Integrates is a unique event bringing together pharma and healthcare leaders across the Pharmaceutical pipeline to address their needs, to share insights and create debate on crucial topics that influence the future of patient outcomes.
More info >>

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement