samedan logo
 
 
 
spacer
home > ebr > summer 2004 > fully automated storage creates an open source for genetic epidemiology
PUBLICATIONS
European Biopharmaceutical Review

Fully Automated Storage Creates an Open Source for Genetic Epidemiology

Over the last two decades, genetic epidemiology has demonstrated its ability to identify single genes of large effect through family studies. Knowledge of the human genome sequence and its major variants should now permit investigators to identify genes, individually of small effect, that modify the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. It is this interaction that is believed to lead to common diseases. These considerations led the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) to identify genetic epidemiology as a strategically important area for translating genome sequence into human health benefits. In October 2000 it announced awards to permit investigators to collect 40,000 DNA samples from patient cohorts and case-control series, and to deposit them in a national DNA bank so as to enable third party access. The awards encompassed diseases listed in Table 1.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
By Dr Martin Yuille, Chief Scientific Officer and Dr Cheng-Eng Ang,
MRC DNA Banking Network Manager at MRC geneservice

Dr Martin Yuille is Chief Scientific Officer at MRC geneservice, a branch of the MRC that provides products and services to the biomedical research community. Educated at Oxford and Edinburgh, he undertook post-doctoral research in Genetics and Haematological Oncology at Cambridge, Stanford and State University of New York. He joined the MRC in 2001 from the Institute of Cancer Research in London where he led a team investigating familial leukaemia and discovered the role of the ataxia telangiectasia gene in certain sporadic leukaemias.


Dr Cheng-Eng Ang, educated in Singapore and at Glasgow University obtained her PhD in the Department of Biochemistry, University of Manchester. She went on to pursue post-doctoral research in Molecular Immunology at the Institute of Animal Health in the UK and the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Singapore. She was working in a private cord blood banking start-up company before joining MRC geneservice in 2003 as the MRC DNA Banking Network Manager.

spacer
Dr Martin Yuille
spacer
spacer
spacer
Dr Cheng-Eng Ang
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Sphere Fluidics closes a $40 million funding round led by Sofinnova Partners and Redmile Group

Cambridge, UK, 28 October 2021: Sphere Fluidics, a company that has developed and is commercialising single cell analysis systems underpinned by its proprietary picodroplet technology, announced today that it has closed a $40 million (circa 30 million) investment round. The round was led by Sofinnova Partners (Paris, France) and Redmile Group (San Francisco, USA) co-investing on equal terms.
More info >>

White Papers

Migration safe pharmaceutical labels improve patient safety

UPM Raflatac

Labels play an invaluable role on pharmaceutical packages. Pharmaceutical companies should only use labels that meet low-leachability and extraction requirements. Labels that are not migration safe, e.g. create leachable chemical compounds, may fail testing and result in significant launch delays or costly recalls. This white paper presents how pharmaceutical companies can ensure that the final label constructions achieve their business, regulatory and patient safety goals.
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement