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International Clinical Trials

Electronic Patient Identification

 

THE NEED FOR CHANGE

Recruiting patients today for clinical trials is a high-touch, highcost business with many players and no economy of scale. Clinical trials are the gateway to revenue for the pharmaceutical, medical device and biotech industries, as pharmaceutical companies anticipate losing 33 per cent of their revenue in the next few years due to generics and drug patent expiry. Spending on R&D has grown by 37 per cent, from $51 billion in 2005 to $70 billion in 2009, while the number of new drug applications has dropped. It is clear that the development process must work faster and ensure that no product fails for lack of test subjects.

On average, difficulties in patient enrolment delay 81 per cent of all clinical trials from one to six months, costing pharmaceutical companies as much as $8 million each day (1). In addition, patient recruiting in 2009 will cost approximately $16 billion of the $70 billion to be spent on R&D, and require an average of 26 per cent of the time required for each trial. Recruiting reimbursement paid by the pharma industry to investigators ranges from $1,500 to over $10,000 per patient for trials requiring patients who are hard to locate. Existing methods of finding patient candidates include consumer market research, advertising and physician referrals – methods that are not meeting the needs for drug and medical device development and innovation.


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CEO and co-founder of KDH Systems, David Haddick has 25 years’ experience designing products in association with and for physicians, primarily in the field of medical imaging. While Vice President of Engineering for Dunn Instruments he produced a number of patented products, subsequently licensed by Fuji Medical, Japan. He then founded his own successful consulting practice which, for over 10 years, distributed a variety of US and European imaging products in Japan, and also developed and sold his own system of medical imaging cameras. Prior to founding KDH, David was Product Manager for CardioMatch diagnostic software for cardiology, and was instrumental in initiating and directing clinical trials at leading medical institutions worldwide. He holds a BSEE degree from the University of California, Berkeley.
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David Haddick
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