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Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and Packing Sourcer

Strength in Numbers

Professionals working in the pharmaceutical industry are familiar with the uses of thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, chromatography and mass spectroscopy. These techniques are powerful tools for understanding pharmaceuticals, monitoring their quality during production and for analysing the packaging materials used to hold these pharmaceuticals. As useful as these individual techniques are, combining them can greatly increase their effectiveness.

For example, the combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) increases the information that could have been obtained from the TGA run alone. Combined techniques like this are often referred to as hyphenated techniques, in this case TG-IR. The commercialisation of these techniques, many of which have been used as academic and research tools for years, represents an important advance in our ability to obtain useful data as quickly as possible. This article examines how hyphenation provides more information than any one technique alone could accomplish.

DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETERS

For years, differential scanning calorimeters (DSCs) have been a common tool for pharmaceutical laboratories, utilised for everything from research and development to quality control. DSCs measure the thermal response...

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Kevin P Menard is a material scientist with research interests in material properties. He has published over 150 papers and presentations, and holds 12 patents. He is an Adjunct Professor in Materials Science at the University of North Texas. After earning his doctorate from the Wesleyan University and spending two years at Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, he joined the Fina Oil and Chemical Company. After several years of work on toughened polymers, he moved to the General Dynamics Corporation, where he managed the Advanced Process Engineering Group and Process Control Laboratories. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1992 and became the Product Manager for Mechanical Analysis in 2007.
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Kevin P Menard
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Five methods for reducing pharmaceutical cargo theft

In North America, five percent of cargo thefts that occurred in 2020 were pharmaceutical products and 74 percent of all cargo theft occurred in transit, according to the BSI and TT Club Cargo Theft Report 2021. In the US and Canada, the biggest threat comes when containers or trailers are parked at insecure locations, as those were the most exploited vulnerabilities last year. Market dynamics also changed due to Covid-19, as demonstrated by the fact that the theft of stolen cargo in the form of medical supplies such as PPE, increased by more than 5,000 per cent in 2020, compared to 2019.
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Syringe siliconization

Gerresheimer AG

Ready-to-fill, i.e. sterile, prefillable glass syringes, are washed, siliconized, sterilized and packaged by the primary packaging manufacturer. They can then be filled by the pharmaceutical companies without any further processing. These days the majority of prefillable syringes are made of glass and the trend looks set to continue. The siliconization of the syringe barrel is an extremely important aspect of the production of sterile, prefillable glass syringes because the functional interaction of the glass barrel siliconization and the plunger stopper siliconization is crucial to the efficiency of the entire system. Both inadequate and excessive siliconization can cause problems in this connection. The use of modern technology can achieve an extremely uniform distribution of silicone oil in glass syringes with reduced quantities of silicone oil. Another option for minimizing the amount of free silicone oil in a syringe is the thermal fixation of the silicone oil on the glass surface in a process called baked-on siliconization. Plastic-based silicone oil-free or low-silicone oil prefillable syringe systems are a relatively new development. Silicone oil-free lubricant coatings for syringes are also currently in the development phase.
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