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Partial to Particles

Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are almost exclusively passive devices, relying on the energy supplied by the inhaling patient for dose dispersion. Consequently, their designs are crucial in determining the extent to which this limited energy supply aerosolises the formulation to a respirable particle size. With growing focus on particles towards the finer end of the size distribution, achieving consistent and effective dispersion with any given inhalation profile is becoming increasingly important.

The incorporation of a breath-actuated mechanism (BAM) has been shown to enhance the dispersion performance of DPIs. It works by inhibiting the release of the dose until the pressure drop across the device reaches a certain value, thereby promoting highly energetic dispersion and efficient delivery.

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Dr David Lewis is Head of Laboratory at Chiesiís Research Centre in Chippenham, UK, which he established in July 2009. He holds a BSc in Physics as well as an MSc and PhD in Aerosol Science from the University of Essex, UK. David has authored over 130 research publications within the fields of pharmaceutics, analytical chemistry and aerosol science, and is co-inventor of 30 patents relating to pressurised MDI formulations and devices.

After graduating from the University of Southampton, UK, Alan Tweedie worked for a year as a Quality Control Chemist at a UK biotechnology company. He then moved to Bristol, where he joined Vectura, a pharma firm specialising in inhalation therapy. As part of an early-stage feasibility team, Alan was involved in the manufacture and analysis of dry powder formulations, discovering a particular interest in the interactions that exist between the device and formulation. In 2011, he started working for Chiesi at the Chippenham Research Centre.

Francesca Mason graduated from the University of Bradford, UK, in 2010 with a degree in Chemistry, Pharmaceuticals and Forensic Science. She joined Chiesi in 2011 at the Chippenham Research Centre and has now been a Scientist for more than five years. Francesca has predominately worked within the atomisation team involved in creating novel and innovative formulation and technology platforms for inhaled drug delivery.
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Dr David Lewis
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Alan Tweedle
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Francesca Mason
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