samedan logo
 
 
 
spacer
home > pmps > summer 2020 > bearing obsolescence management
PUBLICATIONS
Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and Packing Sourcer

Bearing Obsolescence Management

While the origin of the first bearing is unknown, Ancient Egyptian drawings depict tree trunks under sleds with liquid-lubricated runners used to move massive stone blocks. While not as old as Ancient Egyptian bearings, some bearings in use today may have been produced decades ago. So, what happens when manufacturers stop producing a certain type?

Pharmaceutical supply chains must be reliable and agile, now more than ever. Traditionally drug discovery and manufacturing has been a global effort, but the impact of COVID-19 has tested supply chain resilience. A recent report by GlobalData found that 95% of industry professionals were concerned about the impact of COVID-19 on company performance and 23% expressed concern about supply and demand.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
Chris Johnson is Managing Director at Oxfordshire-based specialist bearing supplier, SMB Bearings. Having held this position for over 10 years, he is an expert in bearing, lubrication, and technical support services for a range of industries including chemical, pharmaceutical, food and beverage, marine, and robotics.
spacer
Chris Johnson at SMB Bearings
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Turkish Cargo keeps growing in the first quarter of 2019

Maintaining its accomplished operations from Ataturk and Istanbul airports as "Dual Hub", the global brand of Turkish Cargo continued its strong growth momentum during the first quarter of the year despite the shrinkage of the global air cargo sector.
More info >>

White Papers

Six Strategies to Stretch Your Limited Drug Supply for Clinical Studies

PCI Pharma Services

Bringing a new drug to market can be a heavy financial burden on any pharmaceutical company. It has become even more burdensome over the last several years as the industry pushes the boundaries of innovation. This is because newer, often more-complex therapies not only increase risk in drug development but also drive costs even higher. A recent analysis of the investment needed to develop a new prescription medicine shows the total cost can be as high as $2.6 billion (1). That number becomes even more staggering when you consider the fact that only about 12 percent of drug candidates that make it to Phase I testing are eventually approved by the FDA (2). The investment companies lose as a result may be too devastating to their bottom line to ever recover.
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement