samedan logo
 
 
spacer
home > pmps > spring 2004 > getting rfid into health care
PUBLICATIONS
Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and Packing Sourcer

Getting RFID into Health Care

The US Government's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said it wants to use 'track and trace' technology to secure the integrity of the drug supply chain to combat drug counterfeiting. It suggests 'mass serialisation' to uniquely identify all drug products as the single most powerful tool available to secure the US drug supply, and believes radio frequency identification (RFID) offers the strongest potential to secure the supply chain. The FDA would consequently like to see the widespread use of RFID and its track and trace capabilities within the health care sector by 2007.

What does this Mean? And How did we get Here?

RFID identifies unique items using radio waves to communicate the identity and any additional relevant information about an item to which it is applied. Its future adoption has made it one of the hottest topics affecting supply chain professionals. Much of the current impetus for RFID can be traced back to an announcement in June last year by the US retailer Wal-Mart, that its top 100 suppliers would be required to utilise radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on their cases and pallets by January 2005. The move has concentrated minds across a range of sectors, with health care the area where there is the greatest need for RFID's ability to offer 'track and trace' capabilities.

Radio waves do not require line-of-sight and can pass through materials, such as cardboard or plastic, and a recent fall in the cost of the tags and their readers has made widespread usage of RFID a certainty in the retail supply chain. Thus, it is easy to see RFID as a panacea for supply chain efficiency and patient safety, and indeed it does offer significant future benefits. When it is fully operational, RFID will have advantages over the present bar code system, notably the ability to read all tags within the reader's range (including tags within pallets) rather than requiring line-of-sight access to bar codes, as well as the ability to read multiple tags as opposed to one at a time for bar codes.

Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.

spacer
By Alaster Purchase, Health Care Project Manager at e.centre

Alaster Purchase is Health Care Project Manger at e.centre. He has spent over 10 years in the bar coding and printing industry having led sales and market development programmes in the UK, European and global theatres. Identifying the opportunity for growth through diversification, he has spent the past three years driving bar coding solutions for track and trace within the European health care sectors. Alaster is project managing e.centre's drive to get the EAN.UCC standards adopted throughout NHS supply chains.
spacer
Alaster Purchase
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Grupo NotreDame Intermédica (GNDI) of Brazil enhances patient care and improves patient access to leading-edge medications by joining Clinerion’s global network of hospital partners on Patient Network Explorer

Grupo NotreDame Intermédica (GNDI) is the largest healthcare operator in Brazil, with 6.4 million members. Founded in 1968, it is a pioneer in preventive medicine. GNDI has a wide offer, comprising 29 hospitals, 88 clinical centers, 23 autonomous emergency rooms, 15 preventive medicine centers and 2 health centers exclusively dedicated to the over-fifties.
More info >>

White Papers

The Flexible Factory Concept: A flexible bioprocessing platform to meet the changing needs of biomanufacturing

GE Healthcare Life Sciences

For the past several years, the biopharma industry has been buffeted by dynamic market conditions that are rapidly reshaping manufacturing requirements. These factors include: • The rise of small-market pharmaceuticals that do not require the production scale of the previous “blockbuster” drug model • Increased titers and process productivity that generate more bulk-product within a much smaller manufacturing footprint • The emergence of biosimilars and continued evolution of healthcare reform, which will increasingly pressure drug pricing and require greater cost discipline • Greater competition and shorter patent protection timelines, which will further ratchet up time-to-market pressures • Tighter capital markets that will create heightened scrutiny for all new investment projects
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement