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Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and Packing Sourcer

Verily Validated

As counterfeit drugs become an increasing menace to the pharmaceutical industry, the benefits of validation to the pharmacist become ever more apparent. Brian Thornley at Aegate investigates

The number of drug recalls, substandard medicines and counterfeit products continue to increase within the pharmaceutical industry. In the UK alone there have been over 20 product recalls since January 2007 (1) with the World Health Organization (WHO) believing that up to 10 per cent of the world’s drug supply may be counterfeit. As a result, the pharmaceutical sector is now facing more significant challenges in the area of patient safety than ever before. Other findings reinforce the fact of this growing problem. In 2007, there were over 175 cases of substandard drugs entering the market (2), a 16 per cent rise since 2006 – with the Centre for Medicine in the Public Interest (US) estimating that sales in counterfeit pharmaceuticals will reach US $75 billion by 2010 (3).

To combat this growing problem, the WHO is working continuously to secure government commitment to new legislation, and to find creative solutions which can secure the entire drug supply chain. In recognition of this need, validation of products through authentication at the point of dispensing is already being deployed by pharmacies throughout Europe, with co-operation from some of its biggest pharmaceutical companies.

FINDING A SOLUTION

Drug validation has become an essential requirement for the pharmaceutical industry, both within pharmaceutical companies and at pharmacist level, as they continue to fight increasing threats and pressures with legitimate drugs. By deploying a system that authenticates at the point of dispensing, the pharmacist can ensure they are validating all products and guaranteeing that patients do not inadvertently receive substandard products.


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Brian Thornley joined Aegate in August 2007 as Chief Operations Officer, bringing with him many years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry. Previously, Brian was Director of European Supply Chain for GSK where he was responsible for managing the supply chain from 25 factories across 44 countries in Europe, and for supporting European sales of £4.2 billion. Brian is an active member of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry and Associations (EFPIA)’s Distribution & Supply Chain Committee.
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