samedan logo

 
 
spacer
home > pmps > winter 2008 > holographic help
PUBLICATIONS
Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and Packing Sourcer

Holographic Help

Ian Lancaster of the International Hologram Manufacturers’ Association (IHMA) describes how holograms continue to successfully overcome counterfeiting problems in the pharmaceutical industry

THE COUNTERFEIT THREAT

Sophisticated replication techniques have made counterfeiting and fraud a serious threat to the pharmaceutical industry. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that annual earnings from the global sales of counterfeit and substandard medicines amount to over $32 billion. Both drugs and packaging are counterfeited, putting people’s lives at risk. The diversion of legitimate product outside authorised distribution channels is another problem. In response to this, many of the world’s leading pharmaceutical companies have directed their efforts towards authenticating their packaging as part of the process of protecting their products. As a result, diffractive optically variable devices – referred to generically as holograms – have become one of the most widely-used overt authentication features on pharmaceutical products around the world.

HOLOGRAMS AS A SOLUTION

Since Glaxo first used a tamper-evident hologram to seal packs of Zantac in 1989, holograms have been taken up in a big way by the whole industry. Many major drug companies use holograms on at least some of their medicines in selected markets and they are used in the form of labels, seals, hot stamped patches and blister-foils. The ability of the hologram to provide effective protection lies in the continuous innovation, invention and evolution in holographic techniques that have succeeded in creating increasingly complex devices that are easily recognised yet difficult to copy accurately. The evolving role of the hologram has also been accompanied by the increased use of the security device in combination with other authentication technologies. In such solutions holograms often provide overt first line authentication, while covert features such as scrambled images, microtext, UVsensitive or other specialist inks provide second line authentication for trained examiners equipped with the appropriate decoding equipment.

Another trend has seen the serialisation of holograms as part of systems that combine authentication with traceability. So called ‘track-and-trace’ systems link on-pack security devices with database management and field tracking services. In this way, the ability to know where a pharmaceuticals consignment has been, where it is now and where it is heading has become a fundamental part of many drugs companies’ production and logistical operations. This is particularly important where the ability to identify the source and provenance of products is becoming a mandatory requirement, as it is in the US with the FDA’s requirements for pedigree.


Read full article from PDF >>

Rate this article You must be a member of the site to make a vote.  
Average rating:
0
     

There are no comments in regards to this article.


spacer
Ian Lancaster of Reconnaissance International, specialist analysts of and consultants in holography and anti-counterfeiting, has many years’ experience in security and authentication. He has served as the General Secretary to the International Hologram Manufacturers Association since its foundation in 1994, and has recently been appointed Chairman of the new CEN Workshop on Protocols for Detecting Counterfeits. Ian holds an Honours degree and a postgraduate Business Studies diploma. Prior to founding Reconnaissance, he was founder and Director of the hologram manufacturer Third Dimension Ltd, and later served as Executive Director of the Museum of Holography, New York
spacer
Ian Lancaster
spacer
spacer
Print this page
Send to a friend
Privacy statement
News and Press Releases

Cobra Biologics completes production of Master Cell Banks for CombiGene’s epilepsy gene therapy drug candidate

Lund, Sweden and Keele, UK, 18 August 2020. Cobra Biologics (Cobra), part of the Cognate BioServices family, an international CDMO manufacturer of biological materials and pharmaceuticals, and CombiGene AB (publ) (CombiGene), the leading gene therapy company in the Nordic region, today announced that Cobra has successfully produced master cell banks for the three plasmids used as starting material for CombiGene’s gene therapy CG01. Critical to assuring ‘life time’ supply of therapeutic, this represents a further milestone in the future commercial manufacture of a drug candidate designed for the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsy.
More info >>

White Papers

Spotlight on Quality in Study Startup

Oracle Health Sciences

This white paper addresses the growing interest in quality in clinical trial execution and how workflows play an essential role by building in the steps needed to comply with TMF guidelines, reducing downstream problems. This proactive strategy limits issues caused by siloes, yielding process improvements measurable by performance metrics.
More info >>

 

 

 

©2000-2011 Samedan Ltd.
Add to favourites

Print this page

Send to a friend
Privacy statement