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Illingworth Research

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email Illingworth Research Ltd, Suite 5, Silk House, Park Green, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK11 7QJ, England

Financial implications of off-site visits in clinical research, perception versus reality

The concept of patient centricity is still relatively new within clinical trials. For too long, the most important person in the trial has been overlooked… the patient. Here, we explore the benefits of conducting a more patient-centric trial for the patient, site and sponsor through mobile, or ‘off-site’ visits. These advantages are much greater than purely financial, although the financial implications of running a more patient-focused clinical trial may previously have deterred some from this approach. Home nursing in clinical trials continues to be thought of as a high value “premium” service, which many sponsors decline in an attempt to remain within budget for the trial. However, is the actual cost of off-site nursing more expensive than the traditional site model?
Financial implications of off-site visits in clinical research, perception versus reality
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